Week 2ish

A wave of lecture-crushing illness brings me this unexpected block of time in which to write about the second week of classes. (Translation: My physics professor is sick and so far this week has had to cancel two lectures and this morning’s lab, so I don’t have much “third week” stuff about which to write.)

I’m running with the pack on calculus, and got an 18 of 18 on the first quiz. The second quiz is tomorrow afternoon, and since today’s class will pretty much be a review session for the quiz, I’m feeling pretty good about it. I’m also current on the online homework, and since you get several chances (in many cases) to work each problem, I still have 100 percent on the homework assignments despite a couple of “how the BLANK do you DO this?” moments. I’m getting solid help from online and In-Real-Life friends who want me to do well.

Physics-wise I’m keeping up, but I really need to push myself to keep working on sample problems every day. I can’t trust my memory to remember anything for me — I have to KNOW it, and deeply, before I can access the information. That makes it tricky to acquire new information that’s difficult to understand…. but the “story problems” themselves help make the text something you can apply to real life. Remember how we all hated the story problems in the math book in junior high school? How upset we were when math stopped being a set of written problems and tried to come out into the world and be relevant and useful? Maybe my particular class missed that because of our particular teacher. He wasn’t exactly a cheerleader for applied math…. mostly I remember he was allergic to chalk.

Mr. Miller’s nightmare. Imagine if he could have used a whiteboard!

Astronomy update: my “free times” didn’t work out with the student who needed a tutor, so he’s been hooked up with someone else. But really, it’s an honor just to be nominated.

In other news, the temperature wavered a bit, then finally dropped into the 30s at night. Wisconsin has crossed over into “WINTER IS COMING” even though it’s technically still summer. Tonight will be the night we all change back to the flannel sheets. I’ll probably warm them up in the dryer before I put them on the beds (I cannot tell you how much the kids are looking forward to this). And as soon as I’m done with this post, I will be knitting myself a pair of purple mittens.

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That was the week that was

Wow, I packed a lot into one week. In that time I have done four online calculus assignments and one written assignment, and will have a short quiz this afternoon; learned how to compose (and break down, or “de-compose,” I suppose) vectors on paper and with Actual Lab Equipment; and finished the Uncertainty book.

It’s not rocket science. Yet.

In the student job I’ve learned some new procedures for handling the paperwork that we do every day. And at some point in the future, those procedures will change again; and at another point in the future we’ll be moving everything to our new location and hoping everything gets set up properly so we can keep those papers moving.

I was also asked by last semester’s Astronomy professor to be a tutor to one of her students this semester. I think I may have a couple of free hours per week here or there (the current hour being one of them), but I’ll have to see if that aligns with the hours the student is available.

The schedule this semester is definitely heavier, and the content is definitely more challenging, but I do keep telling people, “It’s Week Two and I still want to be a physics major.” Yes, it is challenging material, but it’s very interesting and it inspires me to work hard.

I met the other second-degree Physics major (hi, Nate!)… turns out I’ve been sitting next to him in Introductory Physics. We are two of a kind on the university printout of demographics by degree. We both have the feeling that we have one shot at this and we just need to do our best.

And one funny thing….yesterday I got a call from the Beloit Department of Corrections regarding an open position as a Parole and Probation Officer. It took me half a minute to realize this call came as a result of my scores on the Office Support Test I took in late spring. (I called them back and declined as politely as I could.)

It’s time to do some homework and study up for that calculus quiz. Onward and upward!

Learning to fly

I really wanted to put together a post before I had taken any of my fall courses, in an attempt to capture the pre-semester jitters of a 45-year-old physics fan. However, that just didn’t work out. NOW is when I have a few spare minutes, so NOW is my writing time.

I have a busy schedule. I am working 16 hours a week in my student job. Part of this involves helping faculty members pack for a move into a renovated building; part of it is helping move my own office stuff into the new building. We’ll be on the fourth floor of Laurentide; that’s a lot of stairs involved in my anti-elevator vow.

I am also taking Calculus I, Physics 180 (intro to physics for engineers and scientists), and Physics 190 (current topics in physics) for 11 hours of coursework. Each contact hour of class implies another 2 hours of time necessary for studying and doing homework, so that’s 49 hours of university contact time every week. If I don’t see anything to do, it means I’ve lost my glasses.

My goals are to stay on top of the reading/study schedules for each class, and to watch other people silently wash out as I make my next sets of flash cards. I have a pleasant commuting companion in the late Richard Feynman, whose mid-1960s physics lectures I am accumulating on my iPod. He is awesome and funny, and listening to him will help me be able to attack physics from all sides.

Wil Wheaton loves this book, too!

In the background of my regular course reading, I’m almost done with a book on the discovery of Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle. In contrast to some of the books I read last year, this one is very cleverly written. The author’s asides on the private lives of some of the world’s most esteemed physicists and mathematicians make me want to hole up with a year’s worth of biographies and just read, read, read.